Hi. I'm John.

Sometimes I make games. Sometimes I make websites. This is my blog.

Tag Archives: dropbox


The lady-in-the-middle

Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza Rice and Dropbox. What were they thinking?

Here’s a great idea: spend 5 years building an awesome service where people upload their private documents and trust that you’ll handle them safely. After you’ve done that, undo everything you worked for in one go by hiring one of the people who was part of the team behind the biggest illegal data mining and analysis scandals in human history as a board member.

Seriously? Like, nobody at Dropbox stopped for a second and thought: “hmm, are we sure we’re sending the right message, what with the still-in-the-news revelations of the illegal USA surveillance and all?”

People who know me know I love Dropbox. I blogged about it here back in 2009. I’ve been a paying member for years. I’ve got two accounts. Well, had. I’ve cancelled them both and switched to BitTorrent Sync since this news broke.

What’s BitTorrent Sync? Think free Dropbox without the lady-in-the-middle. Here’s an easy-to-follow guide on how to migrate.

How I WAS GOING to use git as a backup scheme for a popular Minecraft server

Update #1: Boo-urns. Github doesn’t support uploading repositories that are > 1GB in size.

It appears that, as much as I want it to be, git is just not the right tool for this job. Instead, I’ve picked up a “100GB” account at Google Drive and will share them there. It’s almost as good and offers the ability to download old revisions as well. I’ve released the world files under the¬†Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Update #2: Put.io

Ask and ye shall receive. I’m still going to keep my files on Google Drive because I’ve already invested the time to put them there. But the next time I need to do this kind of thing, I’ll be looking at Put.io.

Here is the original post for history’s sake:

Hellblade Mobs Minecraft Server

Hellblade Mobs, my Minecraft server, has been in operation since November 2010. For the first 7 months, it was just me and a few friends, white-listed. One world, no hMod, no Bukkit, no plugins.

One May 24, 2011, that all changed: we went public.

Since then, thousands of players have come and gone, and the server still maintains a healthy buzz. We’ve got hundreds (if not thousands) of memories invested in these blocks, spread across eight worlds. It would be horrendous (and likely fatal for the server) if something happened and we lost it all.

Being a developer with a very crummy Internet connection (10Mbps down, 1Mbps up), I’ve always been nervous about this situation. The world files are GB in size and downloading them takes forever, not to mention the act of uploading them to a backup service like Dropbox. Every 6 months or so, I get so nervous that I begin the laborious task of FTPing my files down to my external drive and making a copy of them on an old PC in the hopes that I never have to use it. Halfway through the life of the server, we switched hosts to the fabulous Nuclear Fallout service (referral link!) and it took forever to do.

There has to be a better way!

A recent event with griefers has brought to light once again of making the server files public, which is something I’ve always wanted to do. I thought of the logistics: if only there were some service that I could upload new copies of the worlds over time, uploading just the diffs, and the files could be made for public download whether one wanted an old copy of just a tarball of the newest one… Instantly I thought: why can’t I just put the worlds on Github?

Turns out: I can. Git supposedly is not designed to handle repositories GB in size, but it seems the only effect this has is to slow things down a bit. Compared to the previous situation, I’ll take a 15-minute “add” command with no complaints, thank you very much.

If you’re into Minecraft, you’re more than welcome to come play with us! Connect to minecraft.xandorus.com.

Save Time With Sync

Firefox Sync Logo

Firefox Sync Logo

There are a couple of cloud tools that I use to make my life easier and to increase my productivity. I’ve written before about using Dropbox to help share and sync your files with the cloud, but today I’d like to share another tip/tool that I use daily: Browser Sync.

As a web developer I’ve usually got several browsers open including Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox. Thankfully, both of these browsers offer a neat option called Sync that lets you share your bookmarks (and other preferences) with yourself, on any computer.

This is handy because during the day any number of bookmark-able links come up but I haven’t got time to look at them. Or I may find a link that I need to save and install software from on another machine.

Using Firefox Sync and Google Chrome Sync, any bookmark I save will show up on any PC/Linux/Mac computer I use. No more E-Mailing myself links, no more USB keys, no more losing my bookmarks due to viruses or re-installing Windows.

But it’s not just bookmarks that can be shared securely. With Google Chrome sync you can sync your passwords, preferences, and extensions. That means if you buy a new laptop, the minute you sign into Google Chrome Sync, all your data and extensions are ready to roll. No installing required.

This is really powerful stuff and it’s exactly why the Internet and the cloud are changing the way we work and live. I’d like to hear how you use Browser Sync in your work/life in the comments below if you’d like to share.

Cloud Folders Increase Productivity

Being a web developer, I usually use several different computers on different operating systems across the lifetime of any project. Personally, I have 5 computers plus one server: Access to a Vista PC, a Windows 7 virtualized installation, my main Mandriva Linux desktop, a Eee 701 PC with Eeebuntu, a Mandriva Linux laptop, and a FreeBSD development server.

Moving files from one computer to the next used to be a time-consuming and ultimately prohibitive process. If I wanted to, say, take a break from working on my PC and work at the Red Brick Cafe for a few hours, I’d have to download my work files to a USB memory card then export the MySQL database and do the same transfer again to the USB memory card.

Or, I could burn a CD. Of course, how does one get the updated files back off the laptop and onto the PC when arriving back at home? This arduous process basically meant that freedom of choice in the work environment was severely hampered and was often more trouble than it was worth. But not any more.

Enter Dropbox (note: referral URL!).

Dropbox is a free service that is basically a shared folder in the cloud. It makes sharing files amongst any computer, whether it be Mac, Linux, or Windows, easy as drag and drop. And I really mean that. I love things that speed up my work processes because the less time I spend in administration mode the more time I can accomplish tasks in programming mode. Dropbox exemplifies this manifesto.

Any file you put in the Dropbox folder on a computer will instantly be available on any computer that install Dropbox on. Even better, revisions are kept so if you make a mistake with a file and don’t have backups, you can pull the file in question from the archives to restore it. What makes Dropbox different from any other revision or archiving setup is that this is all done without any administration by the user. Literally if you drag a file into the folder, all this stuff is done for you. No committing changes, no crazy hoops to jump through.

Oh, and the 2GB storage starter account is completely free. It’s the one I use daily. I don’t even think I’ve hit 25% capacity yet.

Take a look at Dropbox at http://www.dropbox.com/